Monday, June 26, 2017

Still Not Convinced To Choke On The Revit Dick?

Que Onda Skullfuckarinos?

I was just flipping through some of the nonsensical garbage on the AUGI site when I ran across this extensive buzzword laden screed from human dildo 'Jay Zallan' that literally sounds exactly like the 'drink the kool-aid' bullshit that was being hurled at the architecture/engineering community over five years ago when I first started the Revit MeP Skullfuck: https://www.augi.com/articles/detail/reconstructing-the-aec-practice-success-in-aeco-bim-revit

The saddest part is the fact that it was written (or at least posted) in August 2016 and seems to be yet another in a long line of attempts to convince people that the way they've (successfully) been doing things is WRONG and that BIMming the Revit way is the only way - I mean, how stupid or set in your ways do you have to be to not understand this?

He goes through the same fucking litany as his predecessors (although I seriously doubt this is his first time chastising everyone who isn't him).  BIM is the future (but isn't software - or a process), Revit is the best, ACAD sucks, people who want to keep using ACAD are 'addicted', comparing CAD holdouts to those who were resistant to switching from hand drafting to computers, opining the fact that if everyone would just be on 'the team' (yay team!) then OMG ya'll - everything would just be rainbows and sparkle ponies!!!


If he weren't on the same condescending power trip as every other Revitard out there, some of his suggestions about how to go about transitioning a firm to BIM/Revit would be adorable.  He's careful to distinguish it as a 'revolution' (ironically - from the Latin 'revolutio' meaning 'to turn around', which certainly describes Revit) as opposed to an 'evolution' (which could indicate growth/progress). Some of his suggestions are actually quite good (if not a tad unrealistic) but are all subverted by an undying devotion to what he views as 'The Way'.

It's also telling in how quickly he dismisses his 'holdout' strawman's concerns about whether or not things can be done in 'BIM authoring software' (by which he exclusively means Revit), the appearance of tags/notes/etc. (because how dare you question how Revit WILL make your drawings look?) and then starts doing the Revit self-suck by insulting the intelligence, experience, and dedication to productivity of those who see through the smokescreen.

I think I've made this analogy before - but I could see this guy strutting into an automobile repair shop with a handful of adjustable wrenches and telling the mechanics that they no longer need a box full of different sized wrenches and sockets.  He would talk endlessly about how 'adjustable wrenches are the future of mechanic work', dismiss any concerns about the (obvious) problems, insult anyone who refused to comply, and disregard demonstrable limitations to the tool he has so graciously bestowed upon the lowly peons (who are responsible for productivity/profitability).

After taking away the rest of their tools, he would occasionally catch one trying to put an extension/socket that they snuck in on a bolt that the wrench cannot reach, and then turn it with the adjustable wrench - at which point he would say 'huh... they shouldn't put bolts where an adjustable wrench can't get on them - see if you can do the job without taking that bolt off'.  Right about then, another mechanic would yell for the third time that morning as the wrench slipped, rounded off the bolt, and resulted in him busting his knuckles (four hours into a job that should've taken ten minutes).

He would then proceed into the manager's office to tell them that in order for the shop to be 'transformed', that it will be necessary to figure out what goals are truly desired (as long as those goals are in line with his 'adjustable wrench only' policy), then to 'create plans intended to accomplish those goals', and finally 'commit to and complete the necessary actions in those plans'.  Oh - and the jobs still need to be completed on time (wrenches down!).

Fuck this guy - and every self-centered fuckfaced idiot out there like him.  Fuck Autodesk, Fuck Revit, Fuck 'BIM', and If You Don't Like It - FUCK YOU.

Next Time: The Saddest Set Of Electrical Drawings Ever Shat Out Of Revit

5 comments:

  1. Hah, yeah that dude is full of shit.
    While I do think that "BIM" in some form is the future of AEC, Revit is probably the worst iteration of that idea and shouldn't ever be held up as a good example of what is possible.

    It's like saying that the idea of motorised transport is great and a Chinese knock off "Toymotor" car is the best example of whats possible.

    Fuck Revit. Fuck autodesk. Fuck the moronic cheerleaders.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Coming soon! The all new 2018 Autodesk BIMmobile (powered by Revit)! Just hop in the custom made driver's seat that faces the wrong way, and requires you to check out a workset in order to adjust it. Strap on your seatbelt (inexplicably attached to the exterior of the car - and clicks into the steering wheel). To start - simply insert the key and turn it while simultaneously pressing the 'keyless start' button and the 'remote start' button on the keyfob.

    Wait for several minutes as the engine model loads (allow more time for the engine model to convert if it was started in a previous version). Once it is up and running, shift into 'drive' (note: reverse won't be an option for several more releases).

    Keep in mind that the 'ribbon' will be taking up a large portion of the top of your windshield, and it will be necessary to tweak your visibility graphics in order to see out of the windshield and mirrors. Press the accelerator pedal - which is conveniently located in the glovebox (which has been relocated from the dash/console to the wheelwell located behind the drivers side wheel).

    If you set your template up correctly, then your BIMmobile will start to accelerate - to a maximum speed of about 10mph (despite your destination being 30 miles away - and an important meeting starting in half an hour).

    As you pull out into traffic, watch out for Cadcars - which will be travelling at nearly Mach 2 (feel free to accuse them of being 'holdouts'). Make sure to leave plenty of room for stopping as the lack of brakes is a 'known problem'.

    ReplyDelete
  3. anyone who argues revit is a better drafting/design tool than autocad is a god damn retard. anyone who thinks revit is better for mep design has absolutely no idea what drafting is. its a god damn architectural design tool we are forced to use and it makes me want to die. revit is literally the only thing in my life that sucks and is the source of all my stress. i am a plumbing designer who came from working with autocad mep and fabmep products and would design jobs in autocad to be 95% shop fabricated down to an 1/8th of an inch accuracy. half the time in revit mep with slope on, i cant even get the right fittings to come in. it takes half an hour sometimes to make 1 fucking wye connection. i want to die. the end.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I always use a lower case 'e' when referring to Revit's attitude towards 'MeP', but from what I could gather from the mechanical designers that I worked with, the 'P' would not only be lower case, but in a smaller font as well. It's painfully obvious that (even now) the engineering portion of Revit is an afterthought at best (with the possible exception of the structural portion).

    It's ironic, since it was a mechanical engineer and his crony bitch at my last firm that were some of the biggest cheerleaders for Revit (almost more than the architects/structural engineers).

    I wad told repeatedly that when Revit got up to speed, that HVAC equipment would simply 'connect' to my panels - a promise which never came to fruition as I continued to have to hammer them to get me the correct information on their units (that they were manually entering into schedules - except for the fact that Reviting was taking up so much time, it took even longer to get anything from them).

    I feel for you - prior to Revit, I loved doing electrical design. It beat all of the enjoyment out of the process. Now I do systems design (with CAD) and I love it. In the unlikely chance that Revit manages to pervade that industry (which I'm sure someone somewhere is trying to make it do), I won't hesitate to go do something else.

    Fortunately, even if CAD disappeared completely, it wasn't what I went to school for, and I had over 7 years of non-cad related technical experience before ever doing a design related job. That's the irony of some Revitard dipshit telling me that I'm going to 'have to Revit' - with my experience and skill set, I'm not stuck 'having' to do jack shit.

    I'm not sure if it is an option for you, but for your own well-being, it might be time to give Revit the double middle fingers, and find a way to get back to doing something you love.

    -SF

    ReplyDelete
  5. I always use a lower case 'e' when referring to Revit's attitude towards 'MeP', but from what I could gather from the mechanical designers that I worked with, the 'P' would not only be lower case, but in a smaller font as well. It's painfully obvious that (even now) the engineering portion of Revit is an afterthought at best (with the possible exception of the structural portion).

    It's ironic, since it was a mechanical engineer and his crony bitch at my last firm that were some of the biggest cheerleaders for Revit (almost more than the architects/structural engineers).

    I wad told repeatedly that when Revit got up to speed, that HVAC equipment would simply 'connect' to my panels - a promise which never came to fruition as I continued to have to hammer them to get me the correct information on their units (that they were manually entering into schedules - except for the fact that Reviting was taking up so much time, it took even longer to get anything from them).

    I feel for you - prior to Revit, I loved doing electrical design. It beat all of the enjoyment out of the process. Now I do systems design (with CAD) and I love it. In the unlikely chance that Revit manages to pervade that industry (which I'm sure someone somewhere is trying to make it do), I won't hesitate to go do something else.

    Fortunately, even if CAD disappeared completely, it wasn't what I went to school for, and I had over 7 years of non-cad related technical experience before ever doing a design related job. That's the irony of some Revitard dipshit telling me that I'm going to 'have to Revit' - with my experience and skill set, I'm not stuck 'having' to do jack shit.

    I'm not sure if it is an option for you, but for your own well-being, it might be time to give Revit the double middle fingers, and find a way to get back to doing something you love.

    -SF

    ReplyDelete